Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10174/10097

Title: Assessing road effects on bats: the role of landscape, road features, and bat activity on road-kills
Authors: Medinas, Denis
Marques, João Tiago
Mira, António
Keywords: Roadkill modeling
Mediterranean landscape
Bat activity
Phenology
Road traffic
Issue Date: 2013
Publisher: Ecological Research
Citation: Medinas, D.; Marques, J. T. Mira, A. (2013). : Assessing road effects on bats: the role of landscape, road features, and bat activity on road-kills. Ecological Research, 28:227-237. DOI 10.1007/s11284-012-1009-6.
Abstract: Recent studies suggest that roads can significantly impact bat populations. Though bats are one of the most threatened groups of European vertebrates, studies aiming to quantify bat mortality and determine the main factors driving it remain scarce. Between March 16 and October 31 of 2009, we surveyed road-killed bats daily along a 51-km-long transect that incorporates different types of roads in southern Portugal. We found 154 road-killed bats of 11 species. The two most common species in the study area, Pipistrellus kuhlii and P. pygmaeus, were also the most commonly identified road-kill, representing 72 % of the total specimens collected. About two-thirds of the total mortality occurred between mid July and late September, peaking in the second half of August. We also recorded casualties of threatened and rare species, including Miniopterus schreibersii, Rhinolophus ferrumequinum, R. hipposideros, Barbastella barbastellus, and Nyctalus leisleri. These species were found mostly in early autumn, corresponding to the mating and swarming periods. Landscape features were the most important variable subset for explaining bat casualties. Road stretches crossing or in the vicinity of high-quality habitats for bats—including dense Mediterranean woodland (‘‘montado’’) areas, water courses with riparian gallery, and water reservoirs—yielded a significantly higher number of casualties. Additionally, more roadkilled bats were recorded on high-traffic road stretches with viaducts, in areas of higher bat activity and near known roosts.
URI: http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs11284-012-1009-6#page-1
http://hdl.handle.net/10174/10097
Type: article
Appears in Collections:BIO - Publicações - Artigos em Revistas Internacionais Com Arbitragem Científica
CIBIO-UE - Publicações - Artigos em Revistas Internacionais Com Arbitragem Científica
ICAAM - Publicações - Artigos em Revistas Internacionais Com Arbitragem Científica

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