Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10174/10085

Title: The Role of Scent-marking in Patchy and Highly Fragmented Populations of the Cabrera Vole (Microtus cabrerae Thomas, 1906)
Authors: Gomes, Luis
Mira, António
Barata, Eduardo Nuno
Keywords: Fragmented populations
mate-finding
Microtus cabrerae
Patchy distribution
Scent-marking
Voles
Issue Date: 2013
Publisher: Zoological Science
Citation: Gomes, L. Mira, A. & E. N. Barata (2013). The Role of Scent-marking in Patchy and Highly Fragmented Populations of the Cabrera Vole (Microtus cabrerae Thomas, 1906). Zoological Science, 30:248-254. doi.org/10.2108/zsj.30.248
Abstract: Rodent scent-marking is often used for territorial defense and self-advertisement, and both functions often entail the continuous scent-marking of a large area with high costs. In species with highly-fragmented populations and low density, in which the likelihood of social encounters is low,the costs of continuous scent-marking might exceed the associated fitness benefits; therefore, less intensive scent-marking only to signal presence to the opposite sex may be used. This hypothesis was tested in captivity with the Cabrera vole, a species with highly fragmented and low-density populations. Firstly, to assess the unknown scent-marking behaviour of the Cabrera voles, we conducted an assay wherein voles could scent-mark a clean substrate. Both sexes marked with urine and faeces, but never with anogenital secretions, and the amount of scent-marks was not different between sexes. In the subsequent assay, voles of each sex were given the choice of scent-mark on clean substrates or on substrates previously scent-marked by males or females. Both sexes marked with urine a larger area on substrates pre-marked by the opposite sex than on substrates pre-marked by the same-sex and clean substrates; however, no differences were found in the frequency of fecal boli deposited on the three types of substrate, and no anogenital secretions were found. The clear preference of receivers to scent-mark with urine the substrate pre-marked by the opposite sex strongly suggests that Cabrera voles use urine scent-marking for inter-sexual communication, probably to increase mate-finding likelihood, rather than for territorial defense and/or self-advertisement.
URI: http://www.bioone.org/doi/full/10.2108/zsj.30.248
http://hdl.handle.net/10174/10085
Type: article
Appears in Collections:BIO - Publicações - Artigos em Revistas Internacionais Com Arbitragem Científica
CIBIO-UE - Publicações - Artigos em Revistas Internacionais Com Arbitragem Científica
ICAAM - Publicações - Artigos em Revistas Internacionais Com Arbitragem Científica

Files in This Item:

File Description SizeFormat
Gomes_et_al_zool_science_2013.pdf37.19 kBAdobe PDFView/Open
FacebookTwitterDeliciousLinkedInDiggGoogle BookmarksMySpaceOrkut
Formato BibTex mendeley Endnote Logotipo do DeGóis 

Items in DSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.

 

Dspace Dspace
DSpace Software, version 1.6.2 Copyright © 2002-2008 MIT and Hewlett-Packard - Feedback
UEvora B-On Curriculum DeGois