Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10174/13657

Title: Invasibility of Mediterranean-Climate Rivers by Non-Native Fish: The Importance of Environmental Drivers and Human Pressures.
Authors: Ilhéu, Maria
Matono, Paula
Bernardo, João
Editors: Chapman, Maura (Gee) Geraldine
Keywords: Biological invasions
Freshwater fish
human disturbance
Mediterranean-type streams
Issue Date: Nov-2014
Publisher: PLOSONE
Citation: Ilhéu M, Matono P, Bernardo JM (2014) Invasibility of Mediterranean-Climate Rivers by Non-Native Fish: The Importance of Environmental Drivers and Human Pressures. PLoS ONE 9(11): e109694. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0109694
Abstract: Invasive species are regarded as a biological pressure to natural aquatic communities. Understanding the factors promoting successful invasions is of great conceptual and practical importance. From a practical point of view, it should help to prevent future invasions and to mitigate the effects of recent invaders through early detection and prioritization of management measures. This study aims to identify the environmental determinants of fish invasions in Mediterraneanclimate rivers and evaluate the relative importance of natural and human drivers. Fish communities were sampled in 182 undisturbed and 198 disturbed sites by human activities, belonging to 12 river types defined for continental Portugal within the implementation of the European Union’s Water Framework Directive. Pumpkinseed sunfish, Lepomis gibbosus (L.), and mosquitofish, Gambusia holbrooki (Girard), were the most abundant non-native species (NNS) in the southern river types whereas the Iberian gudgeon, Gobio lozanoi Doadrio and Madeira, was the dominant NNS in the north/centre. Small northern mountain streams showed null or low frequency of occurrence and abundance of NNS, while southern lowland river types with medium and large drainage areas presented the highest values. The occurrence of NNS was significantly lower in undisturbed sites and the highest density of NNS was associated with high human pressure. Results from variance partitioning showed that natural environmental factors determine the distribution of the most abundant NNS while the increase in their abundance and success is explained mainly by human-induced disturbance factors. This study stresses the high vulnerability of the warm water lowland river types to non-native fish invasions, which is amplified by human-induced degradation.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10174/13657
Type: article
Appears in Collections:PAO - Publicações - Artigos em Revistas Internacionais Com Arbitragem Científica
ICAAM - Publicações - Artigos em Revistas Internacionais Com Arbitragem Científica

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