Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10174/25640

Title: Moving in the Anthropocene: Global reductions in terrestrial mammalian movements
Authors: Tucker, Marlee
...., ...
Camilo-Alves, constanca
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Mueller, Thomas
Issue Date: Jan-2018
Publisher: Science
Abstract: Animal movement is fundamental for ecosystem functioning and species survival, yet the effects of the anthropogenic footprint on animal movements have not been estimated across species. Using a unique GPS-tracking database of 803 individuals across 57 species, we found that movements of mammals in areas with a comparatively high human footprint were on average one-half to one-third the extent of their movements in areas with a low human footprint.We attribute this reduction to behavioral changes of individual animals and to the exclusion of species with long-range movements from areas with higher human impact. Global loss of vagility alters a key ecological trait of animals that affects not only population persistence but also ecosystem processes such as predator-prey interactions, nutrient cycling, and disease transmission.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10174/25640
Type: article
Appears in Collections:ICAAM - Publicações - Artigos em Revistas Internacionais Com Arbitragem Científica

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